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Los Angeles Dodgers Advance Scouting Analyst Pat O’Shea

Pat O'Shea, Haverford College Baseball alum and current Los Angeles Dodgers advance scouting analyst, joins the Hustle & Motivate podcast, presented by Joker Mag.
Credit-Pat O'Shea/Dodgers/Joker Mag Illustration

Pat O’Shea is an Advance Scouting Analyst for the Los Angeles Dodgers.  He previously pitched at Haverford College (Division III) where he helped the Fords win the 2016 Centennial Conference Championship.

Fun fact: I had three at-bats against Pat in college. Tune into the podcast to hear how I fared against him.

Listen to our conversation by tapping the play button below. Or tap the icon of your favorite podcast platform to listen on the go!



Show Notes

[4:45] O’Shea vs. O’Shea in the Centennial Conference

[9:16] Lessons learned as a college pitcher

[11:52] A roadmap for starting your career in baseball

[19:57] Making the jump from intern to Advance Scouting Analyst

[24:24] Finding a hole in Mike Trout’s swing

After Listening…

You can follow Pat on Twitter @TheRealPatOShea.

We wish him the best of luck when baseball is back!

Thanks for listening! Check out these related episodes:

Detroit Tigers Prospect & D3 Alum Robert Klinchock

Legendary College Baseball Coach Mr. George Bennett on Recruiting Jamie Moyer & Winning 500+ Games

Jim “The Rookie” Morris on Living Your Dreams & The Truth Behind the Disney Film About His Life

Written By

Division III baseball alum (McDaniel College) and founder of Joker Mag. Sharing underdog stories to inspire the next generation.

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